Helping Your Child Pee Outside 

It sometimes takes weeks or even months to get your child to pee or poop while sitting on the toilet seat. So, it feels like one of the most significant successes when your child starts to use the restroom and pee poop on their own! But is the toilet training process over after this? 

Well, NO, it's not. It is not just learning to pee at the convenience of your home and toiler; that is all that comes with toilet training. Kids need to hold pee for a short while, learn to use public restrooms, and you also need to start helping child pee outside sometimes. This article will help you understand the basics of helping child pee outside and all the associated things you need to know to do it. 

Is It OK To Let Your Child Pee Outside

Peeing is a very natural bodily need and process. Trying to control the urge to pee or hold pee in for a long time can lead to urinary tract infection and many other medical issues in kids.(1) When kids reach toddler age, they start to eat independently, keep themselves engaged in play, books, and nature, can pee on their own, and are off diapers – this is the most awaited phase for parents when they can freely start to go outside on family trips and enjoy the togetherness. Peeing should not become a hindrance in it. As long as you follow good hygiene and kids are equipped to take control, it is OK to let your child pee outside, and with a little push and helping child pee outside, they can master this. 

Talking About Peeing Outside 

This is a conversation you need to start while training them to use the toilet seat. Helping child pee outside is not a one-time process. They must be mentally prepared to do it in the open if and whenever required. Kids need to be familiar and comfortable with the concept of peeing outside. Tell them possible scenarios when they might need to do this. Tell them that holding the pee for a long time is not safe and healthy to give them some perspective and help them understand why they might need to pee outside if a washroom is unavailable. 

Choosing A Good Spot To Help Them Pee Outside 

It might be an intimidating thought for kids to pee outside in the open. Thus, as a part of the process of helping child pee outside, you also need to make them comfortable by finding a good spot where they can pee. A place with soft soil and a few inches of hole can be dug so your child can pee and you can cover it for hygiene is a good idea. Make sure the spot is not slippery, not crowded or is not around someone's house. 

Help Them Brace Themselves

Quite literally, please help your child brace themselves and hold on to something initially a few times, so they don't fall off. Some kids find it easy to squat or aim, but for a few others, it can be challenging. For example, find something sturdy like the bark of a tree or your leg to hold onto when you are helping child pee outside. If you are helping child pee outside on the side of a road, you can also make them squat or stand near the car, and they can hold the door of the vehicle for some support. 

Being Catlike While Peeing Outside 

We don't mean that be alert like a cat while pooping outside. Well, that too! But a cat would always dig a hold before it poops and would bury its poop. This is a good hygiene practice that you must maintain as a responsible citizen in case you need to make your child poop outside in an emergency. 

Having Necessary Supplies To Clean

Parents ensure that kids pee and poop before leaving the house to go anywhere. But the urge to pee and poop can come any time, especially if you are out for longer or your child is eating and drinking water during the trip. Thus, you need to be prepared. Carry a packet of biodegradable wet wipes or tissue papers, an extra bottle of water and strip soaps, and a bottle of sanitiser for properly wiping the bum and cleaning the hands. 

Following The 200 Feet Rule

Suppose you are near a water body like some lake, water reservoir, river, lake etc., on an outing when your child has an urge to pee or poop outside. In that case, it is also your responsibility to ensure that you are not causing water contamination. Ensure your child steps at least 200 feet away from any water body while peeing outside. This means around 75 grown-up steps or 100 – 120 baby steps! 


There is no shame in helping child pee outside in the open and in nature if you are ensuring proper hygiene for the environment and your child. This is an added skill for toilet training that needs to be taught to your child. Happy Toilet Training! 

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